Daily Archives: March 6, 2012

Soiled Doves by Anne Seagraves

Title:  Soiled Doves: Prostitution in the Early West
Author:  Anne Seagraves
Length:  175 pages
Fascinating!

Discover the fascinating yet grey world of prostitution and the women who participated in the world’s oldest profession.  Illustrated throughout with rare historical photographs of women like Molly b’Dam, Lil’ Lovell, and Mattie Silks.  This strong book provides touching insight into the lives of the ladies of the night, from pampered courtesans of the wealthy to enslaved Chinese girls.

Soiled Doves was one of my souvenirs from Death Valley.  The moment that I discovered that this book existed, I knew that I had to have it.  Still, it took me a day or two to really get myself to the point where I paid the $13 for it.  After completing the book, however, I am very glad that I did!

Prostitution is a part of our history.  It’s not called “the world’s oldest profession” for kicks and giggles.  Regardless, prostitution is something that we, as a society, shun and look down upon.  For the most part, it’s easier to pass judgment upon the occupation and not pause to give thought to the women who have lived it.  Seagraves ventures to shed some light on the history and experiences of these women, specifically in the Western United States, during the westward expansion.

This book is fascinating in that Seagraves provides general historical information about the red light districts, the varying levels of brothels, as well as more in-depth portraits about individual women – some of which are backed up with newspaper article excerpts and photographs.

Seagraves is obviously dedicated to the history of women (specifically in the West) and has written numerous books on the topic.  I know that I will most definitely be checking those titles out – though, I don’t know if I can wait until our next vacation out west!

View her titles on Amazon.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Non-Fiction, Women Writers

Monday Quote: Creativity

This week’s quote is somewhat similar in meaning to the one from last week – only shorter.

The worst enemy of creativity is self-doubt

Sylvia Plath

Leave a comment

Filed under Quotes, Sylvia Plath, Women Writers